Review: Jesse's Girl

Title: Jesse's Girl
Author: Miranda Kenneally
Publisher: Sourcebooks Fire
Purchase: The Book Depository
Rating: 
❝ Everyone at Hundred Oaks High knows that career mentoring day is a joke. So when Maya Henry said she wanted to be a rock star, she never imagined she’d get to shadow *the* Jesse Scott, Nashville’s teen idol.

But spending the day with Jesse is far from a dream come true. He’s as gorgeous as his music, but seeing all that he’s accomplished is just a reminder of everything Maya’s lost: her trust, her boyfriend, their band, and any chance to play the music she craves. Not to mention that Jesse’s pushy and opinionated. He made it on his own, and he thinks Maya’s playing back up to other people’s dreams. Does she have what it takes to follow her heart—and go solo?
Netgalley provided me with a free copy in exchange for an honest review. I'm not so secretly in love with country music, which is why I just HAD to read Jesse's Girl. Ir's about music and features a bold girl and a male country star. What's not to love?

Review: The Longest Ride

◆ The Longest Ride by Nicholas Sparks
◆ Read April 2015
◆ English Edition
◆ Purchase: The Book Depository
◆ 
❝ Ira Levinson is in trouble. At ninety-one years old, in poor health and alone in the world, he finds himself stranded on an isolated embankment after a car crash. Suffering multiple injuries, he struggles to retain consciousness until a blurry image materializes and comes into focus beside him: his beloved wife Ruth, who passed away nine years ago. Urging him to hang on, she forces him to remain alert by recounting the stories of their lifetime together – how they met, the precious paintings they collected together, the dark days of WWII and its effect on them and their families. Ira knows that Ruth can’t possibly be in the car with him, but he clings to her words and his memories, reliving the sorrows and everyday joys that defined their marriage.

A few miles away, at a local rodeo, a Wake Forest College senior’s life is about to change. Recovering from a recent break-up, Sophia Danko meets a young cowboy named Luke, who bears little resemblance to the privileged frat boys she has encountered at school. Through Luke, Sophia is introduced to a world in which the stakes of survival and success, ruin and reward -- even life and death – loom large in everyday life. As she and Luke fall in love, Sophia finds herself imagining a future far removed from her plans -- a future that Luke has the power to rewrite . . . if the secret he’s keeping doesn’t destroy it first.

Ira and Ruth. Sophia and Luke. Two couples who have little in common, and who are separated by years and experience. Yet their lives will converge with unexpected poignancy, reminding us all that even the most difficult decisions can yield extraordinary journeys: beyond despair, beyond death, to the farthest reaches of the human heart.
The Longest Ride turned out to be a very dull read. I felt no connection whatsoever with the characters and if it wasn't for the ending, I might have even given it one star.

Fanmix Friday: Jesse's Girl

In Fanmix Friday, literature and music are combined. Some particular scenes in books make me think of certain songs. I collect these ideas and incorporate them in a fanmix for a particular piece of literature. In this case, Jesse's Girl by Miranda Kenneally

Review: Throne of Glass

◆ Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas
◆ Read May 2015
◆ English Edition
◆ Purchase: The Book Depository
◆ 
❝ In a land without magic, where the king rules with an iron hand, an assassin is summoned to the castle. She comes not to kill the king, but to win her freedom. If she defeats twenty-three killers, thieves, and warriors in a competition, she is released from prison to serve as the king's champion. Her name is Celaena Sardothien. 

The Crown Prince will provoke her. The Captain of the Guard will protect her. But something evil dwells in the castle of glass--and it's there to kill. When her competitors start dying one by one, Celaena's fight for freedom becomes a fight for survival, and a desperate quest to root out the evil before it destroys her world.
This book has been recommended to me so many times that I was sure it would disappoint, would not live up to its hype. It was wonderful though, to the point where I was tempted to stay up the entire night to finish it.

Review: Dark Places

◆ Dark Places by Gillian Flynn
◆ Read May 2015
◆ English Edition
◆ Purchase: The Book Depository
◆ 
❝ Libby Day was just seven years old when her evidence put her fifteen-year-old brother behind bars.

Since then, she has been drifting. But when she is contacted by a group who are convinced of Ben's innocence, Libby starts to ask questions she never dared to before. Was the voice she heard her brother's? Ben was a misfit in their small town, but was he capable of murder? Are there secrets to uncover at the family farm or is Libby deluding herself because she wants her brother back?

She begins to realise that everyone in her family had something to hide that day... especially Ben. Now, twenty-four years later, the truth is going to be even harder to find.

Who did massacre the Day family?
No author makes up story lines as twisted and dark as Gillian Flynn does. If it's possible, Dark Places might be even more gruesome, more nauseating than Gone Girl was. And I love it! 

Fanmix Friday: A Song of Ice and Fire (House Stark)

In Fanmix Friday, literature and music are combined. Some particular scenes in books make me think of certain songs. I collect these ideas and incorporate them in a fanmix for a particular piece of literature. In this case, A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin
 

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